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Cabin Rentals in the Eastern SierraOutdoor Kitchen - Main Cabin

Tent Cabin

 

• Mountain cabins in paradise
• Unparalleled scenery
• Fully equipped kitchens
• Additional tent sites
• Ideal for large groups/retreats
• Organic lavender farm
• Summer vegetable gardens
• Horse camping with pipe corrals
• Outstanding trail access

Contact Us: 
p: (760) 264 3213
  
e: delacourcabins@yahoo.com


LOCATION
DeLaCour Ranch is located nine easy miles west of Lone Pine, CA, off Highway 395, at the foot of the mighty Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. We are one hour south of Bishop, four hours west of Las Vegas, three hours north of LA, and only an hour from Death Valley. We are five miles from the world famous Alabama Hills. Thirteen miles up Horseshoe Meadow Road are the trailheads for Army and Cottonwood passes and the Pacific Crest Trail. A quick twelve miles drive north is Whitney Portal, gateway to Mt. Whitney. Just off our land are miles of high desert trails and spectacular views. Within a few minutes in any direction, are trout fishing streams and lakes of all levels.

SETTING
Set in a gorgeous canyon on Carroll Creek, DeLaCour Ranch is a small pocket of private land surrounded by open space. With BLM land to the east, and Forest Service land every other direction, the cabins are nestled amongst giant cedar, elm and locust trees, and steep canyon walls. At 5,500 feet elevation, the cabin area overlooks the Owens Valley and Inyo Mountains to the east, and to the west, the vertical granite of the Sierra Crest. DeLaCour Ranch is far removed, private and peaceful, yet only nine easy (paved and straight) miles from town.

HISTORY
Carroll Creek, and what we call DelaCour Ranch, has a long history. In the early 1860's, a pack station was established by early Owens Valley settlers. The pack station brought outdoor enthusiasts into the high country via the Hockett Trail. From Carroll Creek, mules carried goods and people up into the Cottonwood Lakes area, home of the Golden Trout, and over any of several passes (Army Pass, Cottonwood Pass, Mulkey Pass) and connected with what is now known as the Pacific Crest Trail. Under several different ownerships, the Carroll Creek pack station operated for over 100 years. In the early 1970's, Horseshoe Meadow Road was extended to the top of the mountain, which is where Cottonwood Pack Station now operates.

In 1998, we purchased this unique property and named it DeLaCour Ranch, after Alfred W. "De La Cour" Carroll, a nick name he earned locally on account of his "royal blood." Alfred Carroll, for which Carroll Creek is named, spent time at the pack station around the turn of the century, and was a founding member of the Sierra Club. He played a pivotal role in the Eastern Sierra packing industry. He brought parties from across the nation into the Eastern Sierra back country, and employed hundreds of local packers in the process.

In honor of the Pack Station history, we restored the one remaining cabin, and added tent cabins, screened gazebos, and a bathhouse. With the rustic character of the original pack station in mind, we plan to construct additional horse camping facilities. All site improvements designed and built by
CRJ Construction.

LIQUID GOLD
The most amazing aspect of DeLaCour Ranch is the water. Carroll Creek comes straight from the mountain, offering clean, cold, liquid gold. Fed by hundreds of springs from high in the canyon, the creek gathers momentum and flows to DeLaCour Ranch, unencumbered and wild. The creek keeps both flora and fauna vibrant in the midst of high desert, as well as providing gravity fed irrigation for our small farming, our stock, and our humble hydro system to generate electricity.

The Owens valley has a long history of losing its water to the southern state via the Los Angeles Aqueduct. Constructed in the early 1900's, the aqueduct drained the valley, resulting in the 100 square mile dry Owens Lake bed, depleted creeks and rivers, and a failed agricultural community that began long before European settlement.

The early settlers of this property, for whatever reason, held on to their water rights. Thus today, we have a strong creek along with fertile soil and a sheltered canyon. The ideal setting! Come enjoy it. Take part in our lavender harvest, delight in our organic vegetables, ride, hike, fish, and photograph the wonder. Come overlook the vast Owens Valley, and rest beneath the granite cliffs of the mighty Eastern Sierra. Come take part in our sustainable endeavor.


We look forward to seeing you.

Contact Us:
p: (760) 264 3213  
e: delacourcabins@yahoo.com

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